Camel Milk as a Potential Therapy as an Antioxidant in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

September 21, 2019

Camel Milk as a Potential Therapy as an Antioxidant in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

“Extensive studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a vital role in the pathology of several neurological diseases, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); those studies proposed that GSH and antioxidant enzymes have a pathophysiological role in autism.

Furthermore, camel milk has emerged to have potential therapeutic effects in autism.

The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of camel milk consumption on oxidative stress biomarkers in autistic children, by measuring the plasma levels of glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and myeloperoxidase before and 2 weeks after camel milk consumption, using the ELISA technique.

All measured parameters exhibited significant increase after camel milk consumption (P < 0.5).

These findings suggest that camel milk could play an important role in decreasing oxidative stress by alteration of antioxidant enzymes and nonenzymatic antioxidant molecules levels, as well as the improvement of autistic behaviour as demonstrated by the improved Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS).

Glutathione is one of the most important intracellular antioxidants, responsible for maintaining the reducing intracellular microenvironment that is essential for normal cellular function and viability.

It also exerts neuroprotective properties and reduces neuropathy and hence decreases oxidative stress.

The results of the present study show a significant increase in GSH level after camel milk consumption; this could be attributed to the antioxidant nutrients constituents of camel milk.

Magnesium is known to reduce oxidative stress and enhance vitamin E and C absorption, whereas zinc increases total glutathione, GSHPx, and SOD levels. Moreover, vitamin E has been suggested to enhance glutathione levels.

Taken together, high levels of Mg and Zn and vitamin E in camel milk might help to increase glutathione production and enzymes production and hence to decrease the oxidative stress in autistic subjects.”

Please read the full study fore additional information:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3773435/
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